Interchanging Sentences (Basic)

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When there is an indirect object and a direct object, the indirect precedesthe direct.
eg. Lend me your ears.

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When the adjective is used attributively, it comes before the noun which it qualifies.
eg. Few cats like cold water.
eg. King Francis was a hearty king, and loved a royal sport.

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When the adjective is used predicatively, it comes after the noun.
eg. The horse became restive.

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Interchange exclamatory and assertive sentences

Exclamatory sentences express a strong feeling and end with an exclamation mark. Assertive sentences state a fact and end with a period. Exclamatory sentences can be changed into assertive sentences by removing the exclamation mark and adding words as necessary. 
For example, How cold it is today! can be changed to It is very cold today.
Similarly, assertive sentences can also be changed to exclamatory sentences.
For example, I am very happy that I won the contest. can be changed to Hurrah! I won the contest.

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The adjective phrase comes directly after the noun.
eg. The tops of the mountains were covered with snow.

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The adverb is generally placed close to the word which it modifies.
eg. John is a rather lazy boy.
eg. He never tells a lie.

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Order of Two Adverbs

When there are two or more adverbs following a verb (and its object), we have the order: adverb of manner, adverb of place, adverb of time. For example: We will stay here tomorrow night. 

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Position of Adverbs of Place, Time and Duration

In general, we follow the order 'manner - place - time' for the placement of adverbs in a sentence. 
Adverbs of place tell us about the place of the action. Example: here, there, somewhere, etc. 
Adverbs of time tell us about the time of an action. Example: now, then, soon, tonight, early, etc. 
Adverbs of duration tell us how long an action happened. Example: briefly, forever, temporarily, permanently, etc. 

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Interchanging Affirmative and Negative Sentences

Affirmative sentences are positive sentences that state a fact. Negative sentences state that something is false. They usually contain the word "not." Affirmative sentences can be changed to negative sentences without changing the meaning of the sentence. 
For example:
Delhi is colder than Mumbai in the winter. (affirmative)
Mumbai is not as cold as Delhi in the winter. (negative)

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Position of Adverbs of Frequency

An adverb of frequency answers the question 'how often' (eg. often, sometimes, always, never, generally, etc.). They are positioned according to the following rules: 
1. If the verb is only one word: The adverb of frequency is placed between the subject and the verb.
Example: She always cries. 
2. If the verb has more than one word: The adverb of frequency is placed after the first word. 
Example: The numbers have just picked up. 
3. "Used to" and "Have to" follow the adverb of frequency. 
He hardly ever has to tell her what to do. 

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Interchanging Interrogative and Assertive Sentences

Interrogative sentences ask a question and end with a question mark. Assertive sentences state a fact and end with a period. Interrogative sentences can be changed to assertive sentences without changing the meaning of the sentence.
For example:
Who doesn't want to be successful? (interrogative)
Everyone wants to be successful. (assertive)

Let's look at another example:
Shouldn't he be studying for the test? (interrogative)
He should be studying for the test. (assertive)

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Position of Stressed Adverb

To stress the adverb, it is placed before the subject. For example: 
Readily, he took up the new task.
We usually place the stressed adverb before the auxiliary or the single verb 'be'. For example: 
I usually am free on Saturdays.  

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Position of Adverbs of Manner

Adverbs of manner are usually placed after the main verb. 
Example: She sings well
For stressed adverbs, we may place the adverb before the verb. 
Example: She quickly told him the plan.
Certain adverbs of manner always follow the verb - well, badly, hard, fast
Example: He ran fast.

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Position of Adjectives From Nouns/Gerunds

Adjectives are placed in the following order in sentences: 
Quantity or number, Quality or opinion, Size, Shape, Age, Color, Proper adjective (often nationality, other place of origin, or material), Purpose or qualifier. 
Example: He bought a beautiful big brown dog. 

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Position of Adjectives of Colour

Adjectives are placed in the following order in sentences: 
Quantity or number, Quality or opinion, Size, Shape, Age, Color, Proper adjective (often nationality, other place of origin, or material), Purpose or qualifier. 
Example: He bought a beautiful big brown dog.

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Position of Adjectives of Size, Shape or Weight

Adjectives are placed in the following order in sentences: 
Quantity or number, Quality or opinion, Size, Shape, Age, Color, Proper adjective (often nationality, other place of origin, or material), Purpose or qualifier. 
Example: He bought a beautiful big brown dog.

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Order of Words For Emphasis

Sometimes, the normal order of words in a sentence is changed to provide emphasis.
For example:
Money I need. (As opposed to: I need money.)