Join / Login

Types of Phrases

English

definition

Adjective Phrase

A group of words that qualifies the noun just as an adjective is called as an adjective phrase.

example

Convert adjective to adjective phrase

Eg. Adjective - A golden crown
Adjective phrase - A crown made of gold.

Eg Adjective - A deserted village
Adjective phrase - A village without any inhabitants.

example

Convert adjective phrase to equivalent adjective

Eg.: From this village in the mountains came a chieftain of great fame.
       
From this mountainous village came a famous chieftain.

Eg:  They came to a path covered with mud.
        They came to a muddy path.

example

Adverb phrase

A group of words that does the work of an adverb in a sentence, is called as an adverb phrase.
Eg.: Varun ran with great speed.

example

Replace adverb by adverb phrase

Eg.: He answered rudely.
        Adverb - "rudely"
        He answered in a very rude manner.
        
Adverb phrase - "in a very rude manner" 
     
Eg.: The arrow fell here.     
        
Adverb - "here"
        The arrow fell on this spot.
        
Adverb phrase - "on this spot"

example

Replace adverb phrase with equivalent adverb

Eg.: The bodies were managed in a terrible manner.
       
The bodies were managed terribly.

Eg.: I thank you with all my heart. 
        I thank you whole heartedly. 

definition

Noun phrase

A group of words that does the work of a noun is called a noun phrase.
Eg.: He hopes to win the first prize.
        Standing about in a cold wet wind 
did me no good.

definition

Noun phrase

A group of words that does the work of a noun is called a noun phrase.
Eg.: He hopes to win the first prize.
        Standing about in a cold wet wind 
did me no good.

example

Idioms and phrases

Idioms
Example
1. There is a black sheep in every family.
2. The speaker was unmercifully heckled but he manfully stood to his guns.

Phrases
Example
1. A friend in need is a friend indeed.
2. He is coming at this very moment. 

example

Figurative Expressions

Figurative language (expression) is when you use a word or phrase that does not carry its normal (literal) meaning.

For example, the eye of a needle is a figurative expression. It is a well-known fact that needles do not have eyes. Nonetheless, here the opening of a needle through which you pass the thread is figuratively described as an eye.

definition

What are Prepositional Phrases?

Before we learn about prepositional phrases. Let's learn about prepositions and phrases. 
A preposition is a word that connects nouns, pronouns, or phrases to other words in the sentence. For example, in, on, at.
A phrase is a group of words that does not have a subject and a verb. Phrases do not convey a complete thought on their own. For example, 'the departmental store'.
Prepositional phrases are groups of words containing prepositions. The best way to identify a prepositional phrase is to identify the preposition in the phrase. Usually, a prepositional phrase starts with a preposition. For example, Sam walked into the departmental store.
Into is a preposition and the departmental store is a phrase. Together, 'into the departmental store' is a prepositional phrase.

definition

Participial Phrase and its Usage

A participle is a verbal ending in -ing (present) or -ed-en-d-t-n, or -ne (past) that functions as an adjective, modifying a noun or pronoun.
  1. A participial phrase consists of a participle plus modifier(s), object(s).
  2. Participles and participial phrases must be placed as close to the nouns or pronouns they modify as possible, and those nouns or pronouns must be clearly stated.
  3. A participial phrase is set off with commas when it:
  •  comes at the beginning of a sentence.
  •  interrupts a sentence as a nonessential element.
  • comes at the end of a sentence and is separated from the word it modifies.
For example,
Removing his pants,
Ron jumped into the water to save the child.
The participial phrase functions as an adjective modifying Ron. Removing (participle) his pants (direct object of action expressed in participle).

definition

Decoding Gerund Phrases

A gerund is a noun formed with a verb ending in ing. Words like swimming, tying, dreaming, eating, fishing, and drinking can all be used as gerunds.

A phrase is a group of words that does not have a subject and a verb. Phrases do not convey a complete thought on their own.

Now you know what gerund and phrase are, let's take a look at the gerund phrase. A gerund phrase always follows these rules:

  • Gerund phrases always start with gerunds
  • Gerund phrases always include modifiers and often include other objects
  • A gerund phrase always functions as a noun
  • Gerund phrases are always subjects, objects, or subject complements in sentences.
Eating ice cream on a hot day can be a good way to cool off.
Eating = gerund
Eating ice cream on a hot day = gerund phrase

Eating ice cream on a hot day is the subject of the verb 'can be'.