Akbar’s Policies

Akbar was one the greatest Mughal emperor of India.

He ruled from 1556 to 1605 and extended Mughal power over most of the Indian subcontinent.

In order to preserve the unity of his empire, Akbar adopted many programs and policies.

Let us discuss Akbar’s Policies

The main features of Akbar’s administration were written in Abul Fazl’s book, the Akbar Nama.

According to him, the provinces of the Mughal empire is divided into subas and governed by subedar.

Subedar used to perform both political and military functions.

Each province also has some other ministers for maintaining peace and order.

Each province has a financial officer, also known as Diwan.

There was a military paymaster, also called Bakshi in each province.

There were also ministers who took care of religious and charitable patronage known as Sadr.

The provinces also have military commanders as faujdars and the town police commander as Kotwal.

The nobles of Akbar had large armies and they had access to large amounts of revenue.

Akbar not only had great interest in administration but also in religious matters also.

Let us discuss Akbar’s Religious Policies

In 1570s, Akbar was living in the palace in Fatehpur Sikri.

Here he used to have a discussion with Ulama, Brahmanas, Jesuit Priest and Zoroastrians.

These religious discussions took place in ibadat khana.

After meeting the people of different faith, Akbar realised that religious scholars are intolerant persons.

The teachings of religious scholars create division and conflict among their people.

This led to the rise of idea of sulh-i-kul or universal peace.

This idea did not favour discrimination between people of different religion in his kingdom.

It totally focused on ethics like honesty, justice, peace to all.

Akbar was helped by Abul Fazl in framing a vision based on this idea.

And later this style of governance was followed by Shah Jahan and Jahangir.

Revision

According to Abul Fazl, in his book Akbarnama, the provinces of the mughal empire is divided into subas and governed by subadar.

Each provinces also has some other ministers for maintaining peace and order.

The nobles of Akbar commanded large armies and they had access to large amounts of revenue.

In 1570s, Akbar was in Fatehpur Sikri where he was in discussion with ulama, Brahmanas, Jesuit priest and Zoroastrians in ibadat khana.

The idea of sulh-i-kul did not favour discrimination between people of different religion in his kingdom.

Akbar was helped by Abul Fazl in framing a vision based on this idea.

The End