Finding Out about the Delhi Sultans

With the coming of the Arabs and the Turks to India, a new period began in the context of history writing.

The authors of the medieval period drive information from various sources like coins, inscriptions and architecture.

But tawarikhs are more valuable source of information for the Delhi sultanate.

Role of Tawarikh

Tawarikh's gives information about the administration under the Delhi sultans.

These Tawarikhs were written in Persian language.

There were four stages of tawarikh writing.

At the first stage, a paper was prepared.

In the second stage, the text was written.

In the third stage, the important words and paragraphs are highlighted with the help of gold.

The last step involves the binding of the text.

The writers of Tawarikh were learned men, secretaries, administrators, poets and court men.

The Tawarikh were written to keep records of the merits and achievements of the sultans.

The authors of tawarikh also advised the rulers about good governance and fair rule.

They mainly lived in Delhi and nearby areas of Delhi.

The authors wrote histories of sultans to get rewards from them.

These authors also advised rulers to maintain social order based on birth-right and gender differences.

For example, there was an author of tawarikh called Minhaj-i-Siraj who wrote about gender difference.

In 1236, Sultan Iltutmish’s daughter, Raziyya became the Sultan of Delhi.

Minhaj-i-Siraj knew that she was more able and qualified than her all brothers but he was against the queen as a ruler.

Also, the nobles of the empire were not happy by her decisions.

Minhaj-i-Siraj thought that the queen’s rule was against the social order created by God. A woman should always be inferior to man.

There were also other incidents of gender difference in the subcontinent.

Revision

During the Sultanate period in Delhi, the histories called Tawarikh were written in Persian language to record the Sultan’s administration.

The authors of Tawarikh were learned men, secretaries, administrators, poets and courtiers.

They wrote about success and achievements and advised rulers on governance.

The authors advice on social order based on gender distinctions led one women ruler, Razia Sultana, to be removed from the throne.

Minhaj-i-Siraj thought that the queen’s rule was against the social order created by God, in which women were supposed to be subordinate to men.

The End