Learn the types of conjunctions

Words are our great treasure and they can be bundled together into groups!

Hello there! We know that words can be grouped into parts of speech.

So everything that we utter makes up the 8 parts of speech depending on their function! Makes it simple to identify them, doesn’t it!

Conjunctions are an important part of our speech.

Conjunctions are joining words.

They are like glue. They help words, phrases, clauses and sentences, to stick together.

Example: I went to the store to buy eggs, milk, and bread.

Since there are many of them, conjunctions are further grouped into three types.

Conjunctions can be grouped into three types – coordinating, subordinating and correlative conjunctions – on the basis of their use.

Conjunctions can be grouped into three types – coordinating, subordinating and correlative conjunctions – on the basis of their use.

The coordinating conjunction connects things of equal value.

This means that it would connect a noun with another noun or a phrase with another phrase.

There are seven coordinating conjunctions but we can use FANBOYS to remember them.

Coordinating conjunctions affect the meaning of your sentence. “And” connects things that are alike or joined together.

Say… “I want popcorn and pizza.” Both my choices are nouns and food items.

“But” is used to connect things that are different or separated. Eg. I like coffee, but not tea.

“Or” is used to offer a choice. Ex. Do I want chocolate or cake?

“Nor” is used to offer a negative choice. Eg. I don’t want chocolate, nor cake.

“Yet” is used to show a change. When it is used to combine two sentence, a comma is put before it.

Eg. I just ate cake, yet I want more.

“So” is used to show a relationship between things. When it is used to combine two sentences, you must put a comma before it.

Eg. I wanted popcorn, so I made some.

“For” is also used to show a relationship between things. Remember to put a comma before it. Eg. I ordered a pizza, for I was hungry.

Subordinating conjunctions are the second group of conjunctions.

Another type of conjunction is the Subordinating Conjunction. It connects a dependent clause with an independent clause.

Now we know, dependent clauses can’t stand by themselves but add extra information to the main clause.

For example, "The student failed the test" is an example of an independent clause. Whereas "because he didn't study" is a dependent clause.

However, combine the two clauses, and we have "The student failed the test because he didn't study.”

The word "because“ joined the two and there we have our first subordinating conjunction.

Correlative conjunctions are the last of the three.

As their name suggests, correlative conjunctions work in pairs to join phrases or words that carry equal importance.

Eg. I saw both, the Taj Mahal and the Agra Fort.

Another example: I want neither fries nor ketchup with my burger.

A phrase can also work as a correlative. Eg. Not only do I play the bongo, but also the flute. Here, the pair “not only..but also” are correlative.

Let's RECAP!

Conjunctions are joining words and are grouped into three types – coordinating, subordinating and correlative.

The coordinating conjunction connects things of equal value and are generally remembered with the acronym ‘FANBOYS’.

Subordinating conjunctions connect a dependent clause with an independent clause.

Correlative conjunctions work in pairs to join phrases or words that carry equal importance.