The Ahoms

The Ahom kingdom was a part of the Brahmaputra valley in Assam, India.

The Ahoms were well known for maintaining their independence for nearly 600 years.

The Ahom was the only community that defeated the Mughals 17 times in different battles.

Let’s explore more about the Ahoms

During the 13th century, the Ahoms migrated to Brahmaputra valley from present-day Myanmar.

They created a new state after defeating the older political system of the bhuiyans (landlord).

In the 16th century, they took over the kingdoms of Chhutiyas (1523) and Koch Hajo (1581) and dominated many other tribes.

With the use of firearms from the early 1530s, the Ahoms built a large state.

By the 1660s, they are able to make high-quality gunpowder and cannons.

In 1662, the Ahoms were attacked and defeated by the Mughals under Mir Jumla.

But, the Mughals could not rule or extend power over the region for very long.

The state of Ahoms was depended on forced labor called Paiks.

A census was taken and each village had to send a number of paiks by rotation.

Peoples from the high populated areas were shifted to less populated areas.

This led to the breaking up of the Ahom clans. By the first half of the 17th century, the administration became centralized.

Almost all adult males served in the army during the war period.

Some were engaged in building dams and introducing new methods of rice cultivation.

The Ahom society was divided into clans or khels. A Khel often controlled several villages.

The village community had powers to grant lands to peasants.

Even the king was not allowed to take away land without the permission of the village community.

Artisans in the Ahom areas came from the nearby kingdoms because there were very few groups of artisans.

The Ahoms worshipped their own tribal gods.

However, in the first half of the 17th century, the influence of Brahmanas increased.

The king granted lands to temples and Brahmanas. In the reign of Sib Singh, Hinduism became the predominant religion.

But, the Ahom kings did not completely give up their traditional beliefs after adopting Hinduism.

In Ahom society, poets and scholars were rewarded with land grants and even theatre was encouraged.

They translated important works of sanskrit into their local languages.

Historical works known as Buranjis were first written in Ahom language and later in Assamese language.

Revision

During the 13th century, the Ahoms migrated to Brahmaputra valley from present day Myanmar.

During the 16th century, they annexed the kingdoms of the Chhutiyas (1523) and of Koch-Hajo (1581) and subjugated many other tribes.

In 1662, the Ahoms were attacked and defeated by the Mughal forces under Mir Jumla.

The state of Ahoms were totally depended on forced labour called Paiks. People from high populated areas was shifted to less populated areas.

In first half of the 17th century, the influence of Brahmans was increased but the Ahoms kings did not completely leave their tradition.

In Ahom society, poets and scholars were rewarded with land grants and even theatre was encouraged.

Historical works known as Buranjis were first written in Ahom language and later in Assamese language.

The End