The Mughal Empire in the Seventeenth Century and After

The Mughal Dynasty has been one of the most powerful dynasties of the world.

The rulers of Mughal dynasty left legacies that continue to inspire people of the modern world.

Most of the present day countries like India, Pakistan and Bangladesh were ruled by them in the 16th and 17th century.

Mughal Empire During 17th Century

The mughal administrative and military efficiency led to economic and commercial prosperity in their regions.

Some international travellers regarded the mughal empire as the fabled land of wealth.

However, they were also horrified by the state of poverty there.

During Shah Jahan’s rule, documents revealed that there were a total of 445 high ranking mansabdars out of 8000.

These mansabdars received 61.5 % of the total estimated revenue of the empire as their salaries.

A huge part of their income was spent on salaries and goods by Mughal emperors.

By this expenditure, artisans and peasants were benefited as they provided goods to emperors.

However, they were left with a very small amount of investment after the revenue collection.

The poorest people earned just enough money to feed themselves.

They could not invest in tools and supplies to increase their production of goods.

On the other hand, the wealthier group of peasantry and artisans earned huge profits.

In the late 17th century, these wealthier groups became powerful after earning huge wealth.

As the authority of Mughal empire weakened, their servants became the centre of powers in the regions.

They formed new dynasties like Hyderabad and Awadh.

For a few years, they recognised Mughal emperor in Delhi as their master.

But by 18th century, the provinces of the empire combine their independent political identities.

Revision

The mughal administrative and military efficiency led to economic and commercial prosperity in its region.

International travellers after looking at the scenario described it as the prestigious land of wealth.

But poverty existed side by side in similar intensities, hence the economical condition wasn’t fully profitable.

Inequalities were getting obvious in the 17th century, in terms of rank, salary, and roles of the officials.

Mansabdars received almost 61.5 percent of the total estimated revenue of empire as their salaries.

The poorest people earned a small amount which can only feed them.

In the late 17th century, the wealthier groups of peasants and artisans became powerful after earning a huge amount of wealth.

After the Mughal empire became weak these wealthier group became center powers of regions and formed new dynasties like Hyderabad and Awadh.

The End