The Old Mughal Province: Bengal

After the fall of the Mughal empire, many new states emerged.

Bengal was one of the most powerful states among them.

Under Murshid Quli Khan Bengal broke away from the control of Mughals.

He was appointed as naib, deputy governor of the Bengal by the Mughals.

He quickly and efficiently took control of all the offices in his hands.

Inspired by Awadh and Hyderabad rulers, he took control of the revenue administration too.

He tried to reduce the influence of Mughals in his region by transferring jagirdars to Orissa.

Murshid Quli Khan also ordered for the major review of the revenues of the Bengal.

The revenues were collected in cash from zamindars with strictness.

This led to zamindars to borrow money from other sources such as bankers and moneylenders.

Those who failed to pay were forced to sell their lands to big zamindars.

In 1740 Alivardi Khan became the nawab of Bengal.

Under Alivardi Khan the close connection was established between the state and the bankers in Bengal.

During his period, the banking house of Jagat Seth became very prosperous.

The independent states i.e., Awadh, Bengal, and Hyderabad have some common features among them.

Let’s Look at Common Features of Independent States

First, all these states are suspicious of the Mughal system of jagirdari.

Second, all these states contracted with the revenue farmers for the collection of revenue.

They did not rely on the officers of the state for collecting taxes.

The third is the growing relationship between the rich bankers and merchants in all these states.

Revision

Under Murshid Quli Khan Bengal broke away from the control of Mughals.

He quickly and efficiently took control of all offices in his hands.

He tried to reduce the influence of Mughals in his region by removing jagirdars to Orissa.

He also ordered the review of revenue. The revenues were collected in cash from zamindars with strictness.

So, the Zamindars started borrowing money from moneylenders and those who failed to pay were forced to sell their lands to big zamindars.

Later Alivardi Khan became the nawab of Bengal and the close connection was established between the state and the bankers in Bengal under hid rule.

The independent states i.e., Awadh, Bengal, and Hyderabad have some common features among them.

Mughal nobles were highly suspicious of the jagirdari system.

Second, their method of tax collection differed. They did not rely on the officers of the state, all three states contracted with revenue-farmers for the collection of revenue.

The third common feature in all these regional states was their relationship with rich bankers and merchants.

The End